What’s causing childhood ER visits to triple?

Product: Brain & Memory Power Boost

In 1997, a single type of injury sent 10,800 kids between the ages of eight and 19 to the emergency room. Ten years later in 2007, nearly 30,000 kids in that age group visited the ER for that same injury. What is the injury that’s sending so many more kids to the ER?

According to a new study in the journal Pediatrics, ERs are treating almost three times as many young people for concussions. About half of all the ER visits for concussion were sports-related.

The authors suggest that increased awareness about the dangers of concussion as well as an increasing intensity in sports are behind the sharp rise in ER visits.

No matter what’s behind the increase, I find it very disturbing.

After looking at tens of thousands of brain scans, I have learned that even mild physical trauma can damage the brain and limit your child’s ability to be successful in some or all areas of their life.

Many people think you have to lose consciousness for a concussion to be serious. But that isn’t true. Even if your child never loses consciousness, a brain injury can change their whole life.
I have seen far too many young people whose lives have been ruined as the result of “mild” concussions.

Mood problems, alcoholism, drug abuse, divorce, trouble with the law, domestic violence, and financial problems are all more common in people who have experienced head injuries. That’s why parents need to do a better job of protecting their children’s brains as well as their own.

Don’t let your children play sports like football or boxing that put them at risk for head injuries. And don’t let them head the ball in soccer. Encourage them to try brain healthy sports like table tennis, tennis, or basketball.

If your child has suffered a concussion, even a very mild one, it is imperative that you get him or her on a brain healthy program immediately.

The good news is that a brain that has been damaged by concussion can be rehabilitated. We’ve seen the evidence in our very own study on retired NFL players, many of whom have suffered repeated concussions.

In our study, we put the former football players on a regimen of brain healthy strategies, including We developed a protocol using education, diet, exercise, and natural supplements (Brain & Memory Power Boost, Omega-3 Power, and NeuroVite). The results have been astounding. Many of our players have experienced dramatic gains in their moods, memory, and attention, as well as their weight. I couldn’t be more thrilled for them.

  • Joe Lally

    According to a report by ABC New’s you might want to re-think your position on thinking that basketball is a safe sport to avoid head injury. Especially as it relates to girls and head trauma

  • chris payne

    What “brain healthy program” would you suggest for a child who plays sports and while having never lost consciousness may have been hit in the head? Would it depend onthe childs weight or age?

  • JAK

    What about toddlers that may have fallen and “bumped” their heads numerous times when learning to walk? Should they be on a “brain healthy” program as well?

  • Dennis Sipsy

    The author of this article needs to investigate the topic of youth sports before writing a clearly deceptive and misguided article discouraging children from playing tackle football. In football at all levels, the head is being removed from use, period. The brain injury hysteria is predominantly in players from 15-40 years ago when the head was the focal point of contact. This is not now, nor has it been the case for over a decade. I urge any concerned parent to investigate the Natonal Youth Sports Coaches Association, USA Football Coaches association, Nike Clinic of Champions, Glazier Football Clinics, or any youth football coach anywhere and see if they teach children to use their head to block or tackle in football.

    I further urge you to contact any prominant helmet manufacturer and ask if any improvements have been made in helmet technology over the last 10-15 years.

    Finally, wouldn’t it make sense for parents who know so much more today about the seriousness of brain trauma to take any child suspected of concussion to get checked out? Increased caution doesn’t mean increased injury. In fact, I believe it means the exact opposite. Football is less likely to cause severe spinal or brain injury than soccer, cheerleading, gymnastics or hobbies involving wheels like skateboarding.

    The benefits of agressive team sports like football for the healthy development of children, particularly male children, far outweigh any physical risks involved. Football builds character, teamwork, self sacrifice, tolerance and loyalty to others. These are qualities that turn boys into men, and we can use all the character building we can get in todays society.

  • http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2010/09/13/peds.2009-2497.abstract Ken

    According to a very recent study in Pediatrics:

    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/peds.2009-2497v1

    head injuries among children playing basketball have dramatically risen, even as other sorts of basketball injuries have fallen.

  • Raymond Benning

    have you ever did the brain of a homosexual? can you tell the difference between a female and male brain? I have a theory after seeing your presentations, that homosexuals were given the wrong brain. Males were given female brains and females given the male brain. All the therory could not change this situation. Does this make any sense to you?

  • Raymond Benning

    have you ever did the brain of a homosexual? can you tell the difference between a female and male brain? I have a theory after seeing your presentations, that homosexuals were given the wrong brain. Males were given female brains and females given the male brain. All the theropy could not change this situation. Does this make any sense to you?

  • Emma Mosher

    I have a 30 year old son.He has a college degree, two degrees and lives in L.A. He can not find work, has no friends and hes only older brother has a hard time tolerating his behavior. I have paid for counseling and find it impossible to find the right Dr. for him.
    After watching this beautiful man grow up so depressed and angry my heart is broken and I’m at my end. My older son thinks he has Borderline Personality Disorder. Could you help me find the right Dr.
    I am his mother and would love to hear from you. Thank you

  • Paul Noel

    Hello,

    I am really pleased as professional coach to see such advice from a medical point of view to play table tennis. I can also add that table tennis players manage stress better than normal people and even other sports. I proved it in my final university work using time reaction and NVC (or Negative Variation Contingent= stress wave )

    Thanks to recommend to play TT for better health…