7 Worst Excuses for Not Getting Mental Health Treatment

Mental Health Treatment

Are you one of the many millions of people trying to cope on your own with symptoms of anxiety, depression, or another mental health challenge? Perhaps you have friends with whom you can talk about what’s going on—and they do their best to support you. But even when you feel better for a little while, the worries, sadness, out-of-control stress, and other issues always seem to come back around.

You know things aren’t right, yet you feel like you should be “strong enough” to deal with your problems. Even when those who are close to you have suggested you reach out for professional help, you always find a way to justify not doing so.

If this sounds familiar, there are plenty of other people who think the same way—and they continue to suffer unnecessarily too.

7 Reasons Why People Avoid Mental Health Treatment

Getting professional help can make a big difference in the lives of anyone struggling with mental health issues, but there are many excuses people use for not scheduling an appointment. And a lot of them are based on misconceptions about what it means to see a psychiatrist or a therapist.

Getting professional help can make a big difference in the lives of anyone struggling with mental health issues, but there are many excuses people use for not taking that first step. Click To Tweet

Do any of these excuses or beliefs prevent you from reaching out for help?

1. It’s stigmatizing and embarrassing.

Do you think that going to therapy implies something is wrong with you and that people will look at you differently? First of all, having mental health issues is nothing to be ashamed of—they are not due to some kind of moral failing or character flaw. Needing help is much more about your brain being out of balance, and with the right treatment, you can greatly improve your symptoms. Furthermore, if you don’t want anyone to know you are getting help, don’t tell them. You have every right to keep your personal information private.

2. You’re too busy to see a therapist.

It’s easy to overbook your calendar, but chances are you have a little wiggle room to prioritize self-care. Generally speaking, most counseling appointments are less than one hour, once per week. Plus, many therapists and doctors are available through telehealth, which can be really convenient. You probably can give up a little time spent on social media or watching TV each week to attend an appointment that will help you work through the symptoms and problems that are holding you back.

3. You feel guilty because others have it worse.

In life, there will always be those who struggle more than you do, as well as people who struggle less. Professional help is there for everyone. There’s a reason you are struggling now but diminishing your own needs doesn’t help you—or anyone else—even if they seem to be having harder challenges. It’s OK to give yourself permission to reach out for the support you need. You deserve to take care of yourself.

4. People go to therapy to complain about their lives.

And you can’t stand people who complain. If you’re unhappy with things in your life, are burdened with painful memories, have constant anxiety, or are feeling hopeless about your future, these are not complaints. These are real issues that are interfering with your ability to feel better. Try to recall how you learned that talking to someone about your problems was akin to whining and that no one wants to hear it. It might be old messaging from your past.

5. Been there once, and it didn’t work.

If you have sought treatment for your issues before and it wasn’t helpful, you’re not the only one. At Amen Clinics, many of our patients had similar experiences until they were successfully treated by us. Before coming to one of our clinics, they have already gotten an average of 4.2 different diagnoses, failed 3.3 providers, and tried 5 medications—and still have symptoms. That is why Amen Clinics incorporates brain SPECT imaging as part of a patient’s evaluation. This technology lets the doctors actually see what is going on in the brain. Being able to identify the underlying biological cause of a patient’s symptoms allows the doctor to create an individualized treatment plan specific to each patient’s unique brain.

6. It’s too expensive to get treatment.

While yes, mental health treatment isn’t free, having untreated mental health problems can be far more costly in the long run. It can interfere with school performance, the ability to hold down a job, ruined relationships, physical health conditions, and substance abuse—all of which can be devastating financially. According to a study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, healthy respondents earned an average of $38,851 while those with serious mental illness earned just $22,545. So rather than being deterred by the cost, consider ways you can rearrange your budget and set aside the money for the treatment you need. For example, take your lunch instead of eating out and plan free activities to do with friends or family rather than going to places that cost money. Investing instead in your mental health and well-being is worth it!

7. You don’t want to be judged.

In reality, you’re probably the only person judging yourself for having some mental health challenges. One of the things you might not know is that most mental health professionals are very accepting and offer a non-judgmental environment to help you work through your issues. They provide a safe space for you to explore whatever it is that’s troubling you, and rather than being judgmental, most of them are compassionate and understanding.

Sometimes, it can be hard to take that first step to get the treatment that will help you feel better. It’s not uncommon to have some initial hesitancy—some people have concerns about feeling too vulnerable. However, a skilled mental health clinician knows how to work at a pace that makes you feel comfortable as you address your symptoms and issues and move forward toward your goals.

If you or a loved one is struggling with anxiety, depression, or another mental health issue, it’s important to get support and treatment.

At Amen Clinics, we’re here for you. We offer in-clinic brain scanning and appointments, as well as mental telehealth, remote clinical evaluations, and video therapy for adults, children, and couples. Find out more by speaking to a specialist today at 888-288-9834 or visit our contact page here.

17 Comments

  1. Hello,
    Do you have any Clinics in Europe?
    Best regards,
    Anne

    Comment by Anne — June 30, 2021 @ 3:42 AM

  2. I have been trying to make an appointment but can’t find a therapist who is meeting in person . Of all occupations, this is one that needs the human presence.

    Comment by Christine Willis — June 30, 2021 @ 3:48 AM

  3. AND WHERE DO YOU REALLY FIND A GOOD THERAPIST THAT REALLY CARES ABOUT YOU AND NOT THE CLOCK?

    BEEN THROUGH QUITE A FEW AND ALL THEY CARE ABOUT IS CASH, AND YOUR TIME IS UP!

    ???????

    Comment by JOHN J. NAPPI JR. — June 30, 2021 @ 6:01 AM

  4. I was first diagnosed at age 21 after a suicide attempt. Once they removed toxic agents from my system, and shoved me out the ER door, my follow up care was two non helpful out patient sessions, and I went about my life. I acted crazy, unreasonable mood swings to the extreme, shopping beyond my budget and pay, alcoholism, just one big mess. At 30, I went back into therapy, tried every medication on the market. Nothing seemed to work. I was married and my husband took me to a therapist who I’ve been talking with for 21 years now. My psychiatrist found a medication regime that has made me almost normal. Life does cause it’s problems with my moods and sometimes they are difficult to work out, but therapy has gotten me aware of issues in my life that were causing problems.

    Comment by Natalie — June 30, 2021 @ 6:12 AM

  5. I would need payment plans. Is this possible?

    Comment by Carl Bellamy — June 30, 2021 @ 6:28 AM

  6. It would be great if you took insurance (without exorbitant co-pay) for people that don’t have it in their budget to pay the full amount out of our own pocket. I would love to avail of your services but I’m reduced to reading your articles to cope with my issues.

    Comment by Vanessa — June 30, 2021 @ 9:00 AM

  7. i agree that mental health is so important.
    however….
    when i was hit, rear ended in 2013, (realize this was before they found football players to have Brain Injuries) i spent years… and still dealing with a brain injury. Insurance didn’t help me, the dr. my attorney got me was only for court use, which it never went to court, and all i got was a pat on the knee saying, “i’ve seen other cases like yours.” THat Was It! oh, except for my insurance $$$$ going to attorney and dr. NO HELP!
    the attorney wouldn’t let me go to you because it was too much money.
    i couldn’t even vent my frustration because i couldn’t talk to people in authority. Only realizing now that i also have anxiety too.
    so, spending years of being unable to work, having to live with friends, moving constantly, using up my savings…
    THEN i find you up here in the PNW and think i can FINALLY get help only to find out, you don’t take insurance!!! HOW MANY PEOPLE NEED YOUR HELP, but just can’t afford it? It’s cruel, unjust, unfair, ..yes, i know, life isn’t fair.
    sorry to vent, but i’ve wanted to get your help for so long, only to find it’s meant for the rich.

    Comment by lucinda hayes — June 30, 2021 @ 9:37 AM

  8. Hello Anne, thank you for reaching out. At this time, we have 9 clinics, all of which are in the US. We are offering Telehealth and Video Therapy options. For more information about Telehealth: https://www.amenclinics.com/services/telehealth-and-video-therapy/

    Comment by Amen Clinics — June 30, 2021 @ 9:49 AM

  9. Hello Christine. Amen Clinics currently has 9 locations: https://www.amenclinics.com/locations/. For more information about scheduling, please contact our Care Coordinators: https://www.amenclinics.com/schedule-visit/.

    Comment by Amen Clinics — June 30, 2021 @ 9:50 AM

  10. Good reasons to avoid therapy. As with all professions, 1 or 2 percent of therapists are excellent at their job. What are your chances of finding one of those? If therapy doesn’t work you get sent to the psychiatrist. That’s when the stigma really does hurt. You will lose your job and most of your friends if you tell them. If you get into trouble with the law (even as a victim) they can dig around in your records so you will never be able to work for a government job. You will never be able to file a police report because nothing you say is believable. And you will be diagnosed as paranoid so people who dig into your situation (which is a lot of people because of the internet) will spread rumors about you. Also the meds will change your personality often in the wrong direction. Anti depressants lead to diagnoses of mania which leads to bipolar diagnosis. Bipolar meds cause flat affect which leads to schizophrenia diagnosis. You won’t be able to see color. You will gain weight and become diabetic. You will develop Akathisia which is just like Parkinson’s. Then you will see some shrink who realizes that you are really depressed but who won’t change your diagnosis because that will make his peers look incompetent. That’s what happens when you see the 98 percent of therapists who are not excellent at their jobs. And most therapists are crazy as hell in the first place. Get to know one outside of their job. They all come from intact families and have no clue how screwed up real people really are.

    Comment by B. — June 30, 2021 @ 11:07 AM

  11. This is an excellent article, but fails to address the widespread difficulties of finding and paying for help. I’m an educated, well-insured professional, and I struggled on waiting lists for a year to get my daughter help. Finding an “in-network” provider covered by insurance who is taking new clients is extremely challenging, and for many, finding any local provider is impossible. Telehealth can work for those of us who have personal computers and good internet service, but those privileges are not universally shared. Mental health care is an important part of problematic public health care issues in general in the U.S.

    Comment by Julie Carpenter — June 30, 2021 @ 1:43 PM

  12. It is not an ‘excuse’ to have financial concerns about treatment – especially with insurance not generally covering mental health concerns. Re-prioritizing sounds judgemental, not helpful, from you. Personally, I love help from mental health professionals, but paying my personal living expenses is struggle enough with a suggestion that I could do better if I thought more about determining what I need to give up to get mental health support. (Here’s your suggestion: 6. It’s too expensive to get treatment. While yes, mental health treatment isn’t free, having untreated mental health problems can be far more costly in the long run. It can interfere with school performance, the ability to hold down a job, ruined relationships, physical health conditions, and substance abuse—all of which can be devastating financially. According to a study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, healthy respondents earned an average of $38,851 while those with serious mental illness earned just $22,545. So rather than being deterred by the cost, consider ways you can rearrange your budget and set aside the money for the treatment you need. For example, take your lunch instead of eating out and plan free activities to do with friends or family rather than going to places that cost money. Investing instead in your mental health and well-being is worth it!) For the record, I know untreated mental health issues are costly. But worrying about food on the table, a roof over my head and being clothed is a more pressing concern – – especially after/during the pandemic.

    Comment by Karen — June 30, 2021 @ 2:59 PM

  13. Hello John, thank you for reaching out. Amen Clinics currently has 9 locations: https://www.amenclinics.com/locations/. If you’re unable to travel to one of our locations, our Care Coordinators may be able to assist you with resources or referrals closer to you. For more information, please contact our Care Coordinators: https://www.amenclinics.com/schedule-visit/.

    Comment by Amen Clinics — July 1, 2021 @ 3:02 PM

  14. Hello Carl, thank you for reaching out. We would be happy to reach out to you directly with more information regarding pricing, insurance, and financing options. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

    Comment by Amen Clinics — July 1, 2021 @ 3:05 PM

  15. The reason why I can’t get proper help is because I am poor. Since I was a little girl, I’ve had problems with making lots of silly mistakes, learning, and expressing myself verbally, but I was told that I was only trying to get attention and that I was evil. Recently, I was able to see a neurologist through Medicaid. She said that my MRI and my EEG were normal for my age and said that I must be depressed and that’s why I am having more problems with my concentration and my memory. She seemed eager to stop seeing me as a patient. I have had therapy for depression, tried all the medications for depression for many years ,and yet my brain health issues have gotten worse. I think that I am depressed because my brain never worked right, yet she is practically saying that my brain doesn’t work right because I am depressed.

    Since I am an older woman, I don’t think that I will ever get help. I will have to continue to live a life of quiet desperation until I die.

    Comment by Margaret — July 2, 2021 @ 6:13 AM

  16. I need an evaluation done on a relative with spect scan but the relative lives in Hawaii.Is there an Amens clinic in Hawaii?

    Comment by Darcy — July 2, 2021 @ 7:04 AM

  17. Hello Darcy, thank you for reaching out. Unfortunately we do not have a clinic in Hawaii at this time. We are offering telehealth and virtual therapy. We would be happy to reach out to you directly with more information to see how we can help you and your family. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

    Comment by Amen Clinics — July 2, 2021 @ 1:14 PM

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