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Quiz: Do You Have Adult ADD/ADHD?

Quiz: Do You Have Adult ADD/ADHD?

When you think of attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), your mind probably goes to hyperactive schoolchildren, but kids aren’t the only ones with this common condition. Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles announced on Twitter that she has ADHD and has taken medication for the condition since she was a child. Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine wrote in ADDitude Magazine that the ADHD he had as a child didn’t go away in adulthood. And “Dancing with the Stars” performer Karina Smirnoff told the Saturday Evening Post that she’s an adult with ADHD.

It is estimated that 4.4% of American adults currently have ADD/ADHD, but experts suggest the condition is underreported in adults, so the number could be much higher. This indicates that many adults are likely unaware that they have the condition and remain untreated, which can lead to consequences that lower your quality of life and can keep you from reaching your potential.

Adults with ADD/ADHD

Many adults with ADD/ADHD live lives of chronic frustration. Adults with the condition often seek help for the following concerns:

  • Concerns about a child with ADD/ADHD. Most adults are only diagnosed after they bring one of their children in for evaluation. During a thorough history, the child psychiatrists ask about family history. Through these questions, the light goes on for many people.
  • School problems/poor work performance caused by the following symptoms: poor sustained attention span to reading, paperwork, etc.; high susceptibility to boredom by tedious material; poor organization and planning; procrastination until deadlines are imminent; restlessness, trouble staying in a confined space (not a phobia); impulsive decision-making; inability to work well independently; failure to listen carefully to directions; frequent impulsive job changes; poor academic grades for ability; frequent lateness for work/appointments; or a tendency to misplace things frequently.

Have you ever wondered if you might have ADD/ADHD?

Take the ADD/ADHD Quiz

Take this short quiz to see if you might have it. Rate yourself on each of the symptoms listed below using a scale of 0 – 4. If possible, have another person who knows you well (such as a spouse, parent, sibling, or friend) rate you too. This will give you the most complete picture.

Scale: 0 = Never, 1 = Rarely, 2 = Occasionally, 3 = Frequently, 4 = Very Frequently, N/A = Not Applicable

1. Trouble sustaining attention; easily distracted

2. Difficulty completing projects

3. Feeling overwhelmed by the tasks of everyday living

4. Trouble maintaining an organized work or living area

5. Inconsistent work performance

6. Lack of attention to detail

7. Make decisions impulsively

8. Have difficulty delaying what you want; must have your needs met immediately

9. Restless, fidgety

10. Make comments to others without considering the impact

11. Impatient, easily frustrated

12. Frequent traffic violations or near accidents

Tally your results. Having 2 or more symptoms with a score of 3 or 4 may indicate a problem that needs to be taken seriously.

Know Your ADD/ADHD Type

Once you know that you have ADD/ADHD, it’s critical to know which type you have. This disorder is not one thing. Brain imaging reveals that there are 7 types of ADD/ADHD:

Type 1. Classic ADD: Inattentive, distractible, disorganized, hyperactive, restless, and impulsive

Type 2. Inattentive ADD: Inattentive, easily distracted, disorganized, and often described as space cadets, daydreamers, and couch potatoes. Not hyperactive!

Type 3. Overfocused ADD: Inattentive, trouble shifting attention, frequently get stuck in loops of negative thoughts or behaviors, obsessive, excessive worrying, inflexible, frequent oppositional and argumentative behavior. May or may not be hyperactive.

Type 4. Temporal Lobe ADD: Inattentive, easily distracted, disorganized, irritable, short fuse, dark thoughts, mood instability, and may struggle with learning disabilities. May or may not be hyperactive.

Type 5. Limbic ADD: Inattentive, easily distracted, disorganized, chronic low-grade sadness or negativity, “glass half empty syndrome,” low energy, tends to be more isolated socially, and frequent feelings of hopelessness and Worthlessness. May or may not be hyperactive.

Type 6. Ring of Fire ADD: Inattentive, easily distracted, irritable, overly sensitive, cyclic moodiness, and oppositional. May or may not be hyperactive.

Type 7. Anxious ADD: Inattentive, easily distracted, disorganized, anxious, tense, nervous, predicts the worst, gets anxious with timed tests, social anxiety, and often has physical stress symptoms, such as headaches, and gastrointestinal symptoms.  May or may not be hyperactive.

Knowing your type is critical to getting the right treatment. Be aware that although some people may require medication, many people see improvement with natural treatments for ADD/ADHD.

If you’re struggling with symptoms of ADD/ADHD, Amen Clinics can help. We perform brain SPECT imaging to help determine which type of the condition you have so you can get the right treatment plan. If you want to join the thousands of adults who have already enhanced their brain health to overcome ADD/ADHD symptoms at Amen Clinics, speak to a specialist today at 888-288-9834. If all our specialists are busy helping others, you can also schedule a time to talk.

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COMMENTS

  1. Debra says:

    I’m definitely a type 2. My daughter also has ADD/ADHD.

  2. Jamie Miller says:

    Hello my name is Jamie, I’ve been diagnosed with: bipolar depression, anxiety, with an OCD/ADHD combo. My therapist wants me to have a spect brain imaging. I live in TN, and I’m on disability. But I really need to have my brain scanned.

    • Amen Clinics says:

      Hello Jamie, we will reach out to you directly to provide additional information and solutions for you in TN. At this time we have 8 clinics in the U.S.: https://www.amenclinics.com/locations/. If you are unable to travel to one of our clinics, we may be able to provide referrals and resources closer to you. Thank you for reaching out.

  3. Brad says:

    I’m definitely ADD or ADHD, I just don’t know which type and every time I tell my Doc he prescribes expensive drugs which I am not going to use. So, I deal with it.

    • Jennifer says:

      I have always been convinced that I have some form of ADD however after listening to a podcast where you discussed TBIs mimicking this diagnosis I second guess my self-diagnosis. I had several injuries to my head and neck area beginning with a skull fracture and concussion around age 7.
      Would absolutely LOVE to have a SPECT scan done. Is this test ever covered by insurance?

  4. Becky says:

    I can so relate to this. I wish they had the knowledge to treat and understand these problems when I was growing up. It would have decreased a lot of feelings of negativity, lack of confidence, unworthiness, being called, lazy, not smart enough, unsupportive, screamed at all the time which only made it worse and a general lack of understanding of me
    as an individual. I did try but it was never good enough and the constant bringing up things from the past still occurs into middle age despite my successes.

  5. Karen says:

    How can we convince a friend who
    Is suffering from ADD that they need to get treatment?

  6. Bibin p s says:

    I have been suffering from almost all of the problems for a long time!.

    • Naomi Strayer says:

      Me to, its hard but what helps me is stress relievers. Like stress balls, stretchy things, chewable rubber (that’s safe) if any of these help you then I’ll be happy. 🙂 I’m always fidgety, need to squeeze something, I feel you.

  7. Brad says:

    OK, we all have it. I am not going to call that number because I wouldn’t be able to concentrate when a person called me with a bunch of deep information, so I guess I’m stuck with it forever.

  8. Lucy says:

    I’ve had ADD for decades! A few diagnoses!
    ADD meds helped a lot! But being in my 40’s my
    Current doctor isn’t too keen on writing a script that works for me! I try to live my daily best but it is very
    Difficult day in day out.
    What helps for Adult Add

  9. Chloe says:

    I definitely have ADD but am finding Accupuncture to be very helpful, doctor says it’s due to inflammation of the brain. I prefer trying this out to taking medications. We’ll see how it goes.

  10. Margaret says:

    I did research on adhd after my daughter was said of not being attentive in class her diagnosis was a trip cause in our country in the Caribbean its more diagnosed amongst the disruptive kids .
    I saw I fit alot of the symptoms of Adhd but again adult Adhd is not reallynrecognisable despite going to a psychiatrist who said my marital problems is because of my spouse and I speaking a different language and a psychologist said i have bipolar disorder because of past decisions made risky .
    Also premenstrual dysphoric disorder and for those friends i told i am said to be program or happy
    I jus live with it a scan is actually wishful but I commend the Amen Clinic for there work

  11. Kent says:

    I may be a ‘5’, a Limbic Type. I have most of the behaviors listed. I have struggled with math and spelling issues since the third grade, but I managed to get a BA in Fine Arts and an MA in counseling Psychology. My organizational skills truly are almost nonexistent. I am doing my best to get help , but my resources are limited.

    Kent.

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