CONTACT US
Do You Know the Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Do You Know the Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Worried about memory loss? Everybody has occasional forgetfulness, but if it is impacting your daily life, it could be more serious. Are you afraid that you (or a loved one) may be showing signs of Alzheimer’s disease? Knowing the early symptoms of Alzheimer’s, which is the most common form of dementia, is key. It’s also critical to understand that these symptoms don’t always indicate Alzheimer’s. In some cases, they are indicators of other treatable health issues.

Common Early Symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Other Causes That Might be Behind Them

Memory loss

Blanking out on the name of someone you met once four years ago isn’t a big deal. Failing to recall your sister’s name is different. Similarly, missing appointments or forgetting new information can be signs of the disease. One woman thought that her husband wasn’t listening to her anymore because he constantly asked her the same questions over and over.

When it’s not Alzheimer’s: Memory loss can be due to many things that are NOT Alzheimer’s disease, including low blood flow, chronic inflammation, head trauma, exposure to environmental toxins, hormonal issues, insomnia, and more.

Problems with planning, problem-solving, and judgment

Early signs of Alzheimer’s can include forgetting to pay bills on time, difficulty handling complex projects, and showing bad judgment. For example, people may begin making poor decisions with money or fall for financial scams.

When it’s not Alzheimer’s: Hypertension, heart disease, and other issues can decrease blood flow to the brain’s prefrontal cortex—a region involved in planning, forethought, judgment—which can lead to problems with follow-through and impulsiveness.

Social isolation

People with Alzheimer’s may withdraw from their usual activities at work and in the community. They may appear less motivated to engage in hobbies or to take on new projects.

When it’s not Alzheimer’s: A lack of motivation and social withdrawal can be signs of depression.

Feeling confused about time or locations

Do you ever feel unsure about where you are or how you got there? Do you notice that you lose track of the seasons or aren’t aware of the date?

When it’s not Alzheimer’s: Some medications, including those commonly prescribed for anxiety, can cause a sense of confusion or brain fog. So can infections like Lyme disease; exposure to toxins like mold; or long-term abuse of alcohol, drugs, or marijuana.

Expressing anger, sadness, or anxiety.

People with Alzheimer’s can experience changes in their moods and personalities. Someone who has always been upbeat can become depressed or anxious. And go-with-the-flow types may become prone to angry outbursts. Any change in personality should be investigated.

When it’s not Alzheimer’s: Anxiety and depression that develops as we age can also be caused by neurohormonal imbalances—low testosterone, underactive thyroid, and the changes associated with menopause. Unexplained anger or aggression is a common sign of an untreated head injury or concussion.

How can you tell if it’s Alzheimer’s or something else?

If you’re noticing any of these symptoms in yourself or a loved one, it is critical to get a comprehensive evaluation that looks at all of the factors—biological, psychological, social, and spiritual—that may be contributing to these issues.

Equally important is looking at your brain. Functional brain imaging studies using a technology called SPECT show that there are specific brain patterns associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Looking at the brain can help determine if symptoms are early signs of Alzheimer’s or if they are due to other treatable causes of memory problems.

At Amen Clinics, we use brain SPECT imaging as part of a comprehensive evaluation assessment to identify and address each of the potential causes of memory problems. This enables us to develop a personalized treatment plan to prevent or reverse these debilitating issues. Our Memory Rescue program has already helped many patients improve their memory.

Reach out today to speak with a specialist at 888-288-9834 or schedule a visit online.

SHARE IT ON
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

COMMENTS

  1. Sandi says:

    Can you please tell me what the best supplements if any are to prevent dementia and alzheimers.. I’m very concerned.
    Thanks for the information…

  2. Alan Payne says:

    Is itching also a symptom?

  3. Janice says:

    Thank you for this posting. Having just had major surgery I have had occasions of difficulty in finding previously known words upon returning home. In the hospital I did use my c-pap religiously with just 1 occasion of word finding issue. I have been lax in using my c-pap now that I’m home. I realize now how imperative it is for me to use the c-pap as not using it can cause some of the memory issues I have. Thank you again for your continued help.

    With respect,
    Janice

  4. Maggie Beesley says:

    I am forgetting so many things and I am scared to death. Thank heavens my husband is 12 years younger, but I take up so much of his time, or just st stay in bed all day to keep from forgetting something else. If there is anything out there to help please let me know.

    • David Steenblock, DO says:

      Lots of things to do to get your brain working again. Here is my
      List of things to do
      1) ask your doctor test you with a Novturnal Oximetry test. Low oxygen levels while sleeping cause forgetfulness.
      2) are you depressed? That too is a common cause
      3) have you had your thyroid
      , iron levels, B12, folic acid levels checked?
      4) do you have atrial fibrillation? Heart irregularities cause tiny blood clots which cause memory loss.
      5) if you have had a stroke or TIA these could cause memory loss
      6) A high fat diet will prevent your brain from getting enough oxygen.
      Etc.
      Go see Dr Amen and if you have these problems his group should be able to help you. If not I offer stem cell therapy and brain growth factors. Chelation therapy is very good to consider since I have had a 60% success rate with that. I did this type of therapy back in1984-88 but found that 40% kept getting worse and I think now with stem cells and brain growth factors we should improve on those statistics.

  5. Deborah Czech says:

    Since I began seeing the signs of memory loss in MYSELF, over a year ago, I began a good food plan and exercise plan and then I got TINNITUS! ! ! for over a year I have had this constant, high pitched, siren going off in my ears/head, 24/7/365! most nights, sleep is elusive! I AM no longer able to do simple tasks like making out a grocery list, and when I read a book, I almost have to start from page 1 every time! My handwriting is GONE. it looks like scribble. But worst of all, the words, “I can’t remember”, are all too common in my vocabulary! ! ! The tinnitus has been screaming in my head for over a year now, and I was diagnosed with dementia in June. I eat all these foods and I eat only organic and I grow my own organic garden. I am active and exercise 4 times a week and I JUMP on my mini trampoline a half dozen times a day for about 5 minutes. NOTHING is known about tinnitus, but I will tell you right now, from my personal experience, it causes dementia, and there is NOTHING that can be done about it! I wish all of you the best in your journey, which you will have if you follow Dr. Amen’s suggestions. I really believe that, were it not for the tinnitus, I would be fine, because these are the foods I eat, and I was just fine. . . . before the tinnitus! ! ! !

  6. Sofi Rafidi says:

    My husband has some of the early signs of dementia , but will not allow my to discuss it with him. I’ve tried to get my adult children on board, no luck . His outburst/ I call them episodes/ are getting too much for me to Handel. I’m loosing my self and feeling like no hope ☹️

COMMENTS

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Popular

Have a Question?