Is Lack of Sleep Killing You?

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“I’ll sleep when I’m dead.” Sadly, that joking remark has become the motto of many overachievers in our society. The list of reasons why we pass up a good night’s sleep is extensive. It’s estimated that as many as 70 million Americans have trouble sleeping and the problem is progressively getting worse with the proliferation of gadgets and bad habits.

Skimping on sleep can affect your health in more ways than you might imagine. Getting less than 6 hours of sleep each night has been associated with lower overall brain activity. That affects people’s productivity, physical safety, and weight. Inadequate sleep increases your risk of developing psychiatric disorders such as ADD/ADHD, anxiety, and depression, and can also lead to serious health issues like diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

When you miss out on sleep, your brain pays the price. A recent study conducted in Italy found that a sleep deprived brain can actually begin to eat itself. Chronic lack of sleep leads to irreversible loss of brain cells and also increases the brain plaque believed to contribute to age-related memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease.

If you’re tired of being tired, here are three simple ways you can prevent the negative effects of sleep deprivation:

Avoid Sleep Stealers

Getting a good night’s sleep is becoming little more than an elusive dream for many of us. It’s easy to develop bad sleep habits when leading a busy life. To restore proper balance to your sleep cycle, avoid common sleep stealers like caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, daytime naps, and using technology in bed and right before bed.

Get Nutritional Support

There are many contributing factors to habitual wakefulness. If you’re having problems “turning off” your brain at night or staying asleep, a good nutritional supplement can support your body’s natural relaxation response and produce a soothing, sedative effect. Look for supplements that contain vitamin B6, magnesium, GABA, valerian, and melatonin. These can help relax your body and mind.

Practice Good Sleep Hygiene

Though often associated with cleanliness, hygiene also applies to behavioral practices designed to sustain optimal health. Sleep hygiene is extremely important for a person’s brain health, physical health, and overall well-being. Follow these proven strategies to improve your sleep hygiene.

If you’re not getting enough sleep, or if you’re not feeling refreshed after sleep, Amen Clinics can help. Since sleep disorders often occur alongside other physical and mental health conditions, we seek to understand each patient’s individual challenges. We don’t just treat symptoms, we treat the root of the problem. Our goal is to help you achieve and maintain peaceful sleep without the use of sleeping pills or sedatives. One of the best ways we can accomplish that is with the use of brain SPECT imaging.

Our Full Evaluation of your biological, psychological, social, and spiritual history, coupled with two brain SPECT imaging scans, cognitive testing, and a clinical assessment is designed to address your unique needs and offer targeted treatment options.

Sleep deprivation is hazardous to your health. We can help improve the quality of your sleep. Call us today at 888-288-9834 or visit us online to schedule a visit.

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Amen Clinics

The Amen Clinics Method-developed through 26 years of clinical practice-treats ADD/ADHD, anxiety, depression, TBI, bipolar, schizophrenia, PTSD, memory & more. Our experienced clinical staff can help treat these conditions with SPECT brain imaging or by recommending our other exceptional ancillary services if necessary. Connect with us today by calling 888-288-9834, we are waiting to see how we can help you or a loved one in their journey to better brain health.
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  • Roberta Peterson

    Hi,
    My sleep deficit is nearing our country’s deficit. This is despite knowing the dangers. Are you familiar with sleep avoidance? This is the cause of my severe sleep deprivation. Sometimes it’s work related (kind of). Night time is the only time nothing “gets in” as long as I am awake. I don’t think it is too common. It does cause serious problems. I have what would appear to others as narcolepsy, but it is caused by my own behavior. I have yet to make it past three nights of seven hours of sleep. I often wake up feeling doom as soon as I open my eyes if I have had a decent night of sleep. It started from being in a hyperarousal state. I’ve had chronic stress for about five years. Truly. I don’t see it ending soon.
    Thanks –
    Roberta

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